Blog

#WIIS – What If It Sucks? My SAT/ACT Score

If you’re a high school student planning to apply to college, college admissions tests are probably on your mind. Should I take the SAT or the ACT? How can I prep for the SAT or the ACT? And, most worrisome of all… What if I bomb the SAT or ACT? For students who do well in school and just can’t seem to get those high test scores, this is no small w…

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Posted December 15th, 2017

The Season of Giving

Charitable giving tends to reach a peak during the holiday season, when a feeling of warmth and goodwill tends to spread. There are many opportunities for giving back to the community at this time of year, from food drives to toy drives and everything in between. If you’re moved by the season of giving, why not jump in headfirst? You can make a big difference to m…

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Posted December 7th, 2017

#WIIS – What If It Sucks? My GPA

In our three-part series about what college admissions officers looked at, we explored the importance of grades in admissions decisions. College admissions officers consistently rank grades as the most important factor in admissions decisions, so it’s no wonder students worry about less than stellar GPAs. What is a bad GPA? There’s no magic number that defines a …

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Posted November 30th, 2017

Webinar – Your PSAT Score Report

The PSAT is an important tool. It helps students understand their strengths and weaknesses as they begin preparing for the SAT. As such, it’s very important to understand the exam, what it’s testing and how you can prepare and improve on it. Join us on Wednesday, December 13th, at 8:00pm EST (5:00pm PST), as our own Jesse Pizarro walks through a PSAT score repor…

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Posted November 29th, 2017

Five Tips to Help You Prep for Finals

It’s time to prep for finals, and you need a win to finish the semester strong. So to help you, we’ve put together some tips to make sure you get the most out of your studying and preparation before the big test day. And don’t just take out word for it… these tips are all based on science! Tip #1: Don’t cram When you cram information all at once, it’s lik…

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Posted November 16th, 2017

Volunteering: Giving Back During the Holiday Season

It’s wonderful to think about the holiday season. You probably think of food, time spent with family and loved ones, and, probably, some nice gifts. But most of all, the holiday season is also a time of giving, of goodwill toward your fellow man. As a result, it’s not surprising that volunteering tends to reach its peak as the holidays approach. Why volunteer? Th…

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Posted November 9th, 2017

Safety Schools: Why Every Student Needs Them

There’s really no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to deciding how many colleges to apply to, but there is one hard and fast rule that applies to every student: Everyone should apply to a number of safety schools. What Is a safety school? Many people think that a safety school is a “bad” school, but this isn’t true at all! Sure, safety schools are les…

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Posted November 2nd, 2017

Webinar – SAT or ACT? Which test should I take?

Lots of students, and parents especially, have only a vague sense of what appears on the SAT or ACT. Recalling from when they took it themselves, they have little idea how what’s on the exam relates to what students are learning in school, and they have a hard time choosing between the two similar exams. Join us on Wednesday, November 15th, at 8:00pm EST (5:00pm P…

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Posted November 2nd, 2017

Webinar – How To Write A Winning Essay

College essays are easy, right? Just write what you think admissions officers want to hear, right? WRONG! Students often end up falling into the trap of writing clichéd essays because of these thoughts. Join us on Wednesday, November 8th, at 8:00PM EST (5:00PM PST), as C2’s own Teacher Trainer, Jesse Pizarro will teach you how to write a winning essay. Writ…

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Posted October 31st, 2017

4 College Admissions Nightmares and How to Avoid Them

Getting into college used to be a relatively simple process. Because higher education was mostly reserved for privileged members of society, colleges tended to accept any high school student in good standing whose parents could pay the cost of tuition. (more…)…

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Posted October 31st, 2017