When it comes to college admissions testing, it can be hard to figure out which ones you need to take. Let C2 Education help make a plan for you!

Are you ready for college admissions testing? There are literally dozens of standardized tests available to college-bound students, all of them with confusing-sounding acronyms. It can be pretty tough to figure out which tests you need to take, which tests you should take, and which tests you can skip. We’re here to help.

Needed Tests

For the majority of college-bound students, there’s really only one test that you’ll NEED to take: the SAT or ACT. There are plenty of schools that have gone test optional where you might be able to submit other materials (usually other test scores). Most top-ranked four-year colleges still require that students submit either the SAT or the ACT.

Always check the testing requirements at the schools where you’re applying to. Many schools require additional test scores, and you need to be prepared.

Recommended Tests

Beyond the SAT or the ACT, there are plenty of other options. Students intending to apply to selective colleges should go beyond the SAT and the ACT.

  • AP Exams: Colleges look for students who take really tough classes, and at most high schools, this means AP classes. In order to earn college credit for the classes, students need to earn high AP exam scores. While these scores don’t generally play a role in admission, they’re still definitely worth taking. After all, why put in the effort of an AP class without getting the college credit for it?
  • SAT Subject Tests: Some colleges require SAT Subject Tests – MIT, for example, requires one math score and one science score. Others recommend them, and always treat a recommendation as a requirement when it comes to college admissions. Regardless if they’re required or recommended, SAT Subject Tests can help add depth to your application.

Great Practice

And then there are the tests that offer some really valuable practice. These tests include the PSAT 8/9, the PSAT 10, and the PSAT/NMSQT. In addition to valuable practice, the PSAT/NMSQT acts as the qualifying test for the National Merit Scholarship. Only the top 1% of test-takers receive this prestigious award. For students who qualify, competition in the National Merit Scholarship program can be a big bonus on a college application.

When to Test

Once you figure out which tests to take, you need to figure out when to take them.

  • Practice tests: 9th grade through fall of 11th grade
    8th/9th and 10th graders take the PSAT 8/9 and PSAT 10 respectively. Juniors take the PSAT/NMSQT in October that year. 
  • AP Exams: May after completing the course
    Students take the AP exams each May after finishing the corresponding course.
  • SAT Subject Tests: Recommend taking them in June after completing the corresponding course
    On most of the same dates as the SAT, SAT Subject Tests are offered. We recommend taking them in June after finishing an honors or AP level class. For example, if a student takes AP Chemistry as a sophomore, he should take the SAT Chemistry test in June after. This makes the most of prep for finals and AP exams while sidestepping the already stressful May AP exam season.
  • ACT/SAT: Spring of 11th grade through fall of 12th grade
    Students can take the ACT or SAT on any test date, but it’s best to wait until spring of junior year. Colleges want to see scores that are fairly recent and waiting ensures max scores. Taking the test for the first time in spring of junior year also allows you several chances to retake the test before college applications are due in late fall or winter.

Plan for the college admissions test

Prepping for any one of these tests is a marathon, not a sprint. Students should plan to spend anywhere from four weeks to more than three months on test prep in order to maximize their scores. Check out the table below for a quick reference guide on college admission tests.

TestWho?Why?When?Prep Time
PSAT 8/9 or PSAT 108th and 9th grade students (for the PSAT 8/9) or 10th grade students (for the PSAT 10)Practice for the PSAT/NMSQT and SATOffered on specific dates by the student’s schoolNone – this test is usually used for diagnostic and progress assessment purposes
PSAT/NMSQT11th grade studentsCompete for the National Merit ScholarshipOctober of 11th grade3+ months – students who hope to be competitive should dedicate several months to PSAT prep, which will then help them get ahead on SAT prep
SAT11th and 12th grade studentsUsed for college admissionsOffered throughout the year (usually in August, October, November, December, March, May, and June) – recommend taking it spring of junior year and again fall of senior year3+ months – Many students spend up to a year or more preparing for this test because admissions test scores are among the top three factors in college admission decisions
ACT11th and 12th grade studentsUsed for college admissionsOffered throughout the year (usually in September, October, December, February, April, June, and July) – recommend taking it spring of junior year and again fall of senior year3+ months – Many students spend up to a year or more preparing for this test because admissions test scores are among the top three factors in college admission decisions
SAT Subject Tests9th-12th grade studentsSome colleges require these tests for admission while others simply consider SAT Subject Test scores; some colleges also use these scores for placement purposesOffered on most SAT test dates throughout the year – recommend taking SAT Subject Tests in May or June after completing the relevant coursework4-6 weeks – These multiple choice tests are generally considered easier than AP exams, but the bar is set very high since only scores in the 700+ range are likely to help with college admissions
AP Exams9th-12th grade studentsMost students take these after completing the relevant AP course; colleges award credit based on AP exam scores, although score cutoffs and credit policies vary widely from college to collegeOffered during a two-week window in May of each year2+ months – AP exams are rigorous and in-depth, so they require a great deal of preparation